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Specialized Groove

These are the songs that are NOT shuffles or swings.  They are all straight eighth note grooves like the Rumba, Hambone, Tramp, Cha Cha Cha, Old Time, and Boogaloo.
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3pm Rumba Download3pm Rumba DownloadThis is a study of the blues rumba played in a minor key similar to Howlin’ Wolf’s song, “Who’s Been Talking” and executed in third position, Bm on an “A” harp. . . .
Chasin' Lost Sonny DownloadChasin' Lost Sonny DownloadPlease note that there are two things different about this song, “Chasin' Lost Sonny.”  
First, it is twice the price.  That is because it was at least twice as hard to prepare as anything else here in the Filisko Store.  
The second is that there is not a single defined final arrangement for the song but instead, numerous building blocks that you will need to arrange into your own version of Sonny's stylistic.  If you goal is to capture his special style, you will need to do a lot of listening to the numerous versions of this type of piece that he recorded.  Some of those are listed in the song notes.  You will hear these building blocks and countless variations of them.  Please also go back and review the song notes often and continually listen to the sample tracks on the CD. 
Cubano Cha Cha DownloadCubano Cha Cha DownloadThis is a study of the Cha-cha-cha groove originated in Cuba and used by Muddy Waters in the head of later versions of his song, “Walking Thru The Park.” Slim Harpo’s “Buzzin” and Junior Wells’s “Cha Cha Cha in Blue” are other recorded songs using this type of riff driven groove. . . 
Deford's DreamDeford's DreamThis study song is much like the first known cross harp, 2nd position recordings, that were then referred to as “choking.” This will be another tool, along with “Skip To My Lou” and “Henry’s Lament,” to give insight into the amazing layers of technique hidden behind DeFord Bailey, Kyle Wooten, Palmer McAbee and others. . .
Did-lee 12-Bar DownloadDid-lee 12-Bar DownloadThis LEVEL III instrumental is a study of the Hambone groove very often associated with many songs by Bo Diddley and early Rock & Roll.  It’s an Afro-Cuban clave rhythm.  Most often you will hear this groove faster and used over a continuous I chord like the song “Bo Diddley.”
Jerry's Cajun Blues DownloadJerry's Cajun Blues Downloadhis is a study of the Cajun approach to playing the harmonica which seems to have first been recorded by Arteleus Mistric on November 7, 1929 and later by players like Isom Fontenot and my dear brother Mr. Jerry Devillier, for whom this song is named.  Key to the Cajun approach is playing lots of splits that outline the chord changes and keep the rhythm pumping accurately with the breath pulse.  This is exactly what the single row Cajun accordion is doing.  It is basically tuned just like the harmonica.  Check out the Filisko Tongue Block Trainer if you need help developing accuracy with your splits.
Rumba Blues DownloadRumba Blues DownloadThis is a study of the commonly heard blues rumba.  One big advantage of knowing a song like this is that it is highly recognizable to any band that is familiar with blues.  This allows you to start the song off and signal the band in at the IV chord if your rhythm and playing are strong . . .
Skip to My Lou DownloadSkip to My Lou DownloadThis is a great song to help comprehend many aspects of the intricate playing styles of DeFord Bailey, Kyle Wooten and other solo players. All the notes are easily available in two octaves and the chords fit and support the melody perfectly in the low octave. This will touch on some of the most obvious ways to ornament what happens underneath and around the melody. . . 
USB BluesUSB Blueshis is a study of the horn riff used in the Gary US Bonds song, Down In New Orleans. This groove is not a shuffle or swing. It is a straight eighth note Rock type of groove. The overall tonality is very blues “lite,” actually using the major scale. The solo is very accordion like . . .
Wishing BluesWishing BluesThis is a study of the Jungle groove, blues scale and the riff used in the Billy Boy Arnold song “I Wish You Would,” but sequenced into a 12-bar form similar to the Ray Charles song, “What’d I Say?”. This groove is not a shuffle or swing. It is a straight 8th-note groove with a heavy use of the tom drums. The overall tonality is very dark blues and is also a study in tongue block switching . . .
Zulu BoogalooZulu BoogalooThis is a study of the Boogaloo groove, which got its name from the 1960s dance of the same name. Remember that this groove is not a shuffle or swing. It is a straight-eighth note groove, very similar to the “Tramp” groove. Check out the George Harmonica Smith song, “Avalon Boogaloo.” This is also a study in how to use the blues scale. This song requires solid tongue blocking and breathing skills and moderate bending skills. Everything except the chords should be played using tongue blocking . . . 
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