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Big Jim's Blues DownloadBig Jim's Blues DownloadIntermediate Instruction - This lesson is a five chorus instrumental designed for an intermediate player to help develop techniques and abilities that can put the player on a path to better understand the traditional blues harmonica sound. This piece is a slow, low-down, Delta type of blues that exclusively uses the 6 note blues scale and heavily focuses on full bends on holes number 2 and number 4.
Boogie Instrumental 3 DownloadBoogie Instrumental 3 DownloadThe goal with this LEVEL III instrumental is to continue to build upon the Level I & Level II versions of this song that you have memorized. It’s quite likely that you will need a minimum of a year of experience before attempting this. The new techniques you will use are dirty notes, ornamental bending, vamping and the split-4 block. . .
Boogie Instrumental 3-Plus DownloadBoogie Instrumental 3-Plus DownloadThe goal with this LEVEL III plus instrumental is to continue to build upon the previous versions of this song.  It’s quite likely that you will need about two years of experience before attempting this.  The new things you will be introduced to are ghost chords used in between the vamping/slapping, more advanced breathing challenges, more advanced bending, and more advanced phrases
Chicago Box Shuffle DownloadChicago Box Shuffle DownloadThis is a study of the riff often called the “Box Shuffle” by guitar and bass players.  It can be played decending or like this version, ascending.  The advantage of this is that it is highly recognizable . . .
Cubano Cha Cha DownloadCubano Cha Cha DownloadThis is a study of the Cha-cha-cha groove originated in Cuba and used by Muddy Waters in the head of later versions of his song, “Walking Thru The Park.” Slim Harpo’s “Buzzin” and Junior Wells’s “Cha Cha Cha in Blue” are other recorded songs using this type of riff driven groove. . . 
Did-lee 12-Bar DownloadDid-lee 12-Bar DownloadThis LEVEL III instrumental is a study of the Hambone groove very often associated with many songs by Bo Diddley and early Rock & Roll.  It’s an Afro-Cuban clave rhythm.  Most often you will hear this groove faster and used over a continuous I chord like the song “Bo Diddley.”
First Straight Shuffle DownloadFirst Straight Shuffle DownloadThis is a study of how to begin to start and incorporate the skill of first position or, straight harp blues playing.  Up until 1937, about half of the blues playing was in second position and the other half in first.  Currently, blues harp styles are taught starting off with second position.  This is a beginning approach to playing straight harp blues while using all 10 holes.  . 
Greazy BluezGreazy BluezThis is a study of two iconic riffs seen in the previous study songs, “Big Jim’s Blues” and “N P Blues.” I believe that both of these blues scale riffs radiate intense, dark, ornery blues. Folks know it within a few seconds of hearing. If you don’t like blues, this is not for you. 
Little Boogie DownloadLittle Boogie DownloadThis song is a study of one of the blues harmonica essentials, playing a boogie riff. In the late 1940’s and early 50’s, this style of piece was recorded by Walter Horton, who appears to have called himself “Little Walter,” Forrest City Joe and Jimmy Rogers with more to follow. If you are able to play the first few bars with confidence and good rhythm, you will be able to start the song without a count-off and signal the band in at the IV chord. This song is also a warm-up for the study song “Shakey’s Boogie,” which is a warm up for the classic instrumental“Walter’s Boogie.”
Mannish Blues DownloadMannish Blues DownloadThis is a study of the riff played in the Muddy Waters song, "Mannish Boy,' first recorded May 24, 1955 as a "I" chord tune. Certainly one of the most recognizable blues harmonica riffs of all time.
Monday Blues DownloadMonday Blues DownloadThis song is a revised version of an earlier song called B1 Blues.  The riff is based off of the major pentatonic scale and also sequenced over the IV chord. It is tonally very “major” sounding and could be thought of as “blues light.”  
N-P Blues DownloadN-P Blues DownloadLEVEL III - This song is a study of the technique that I call the Nose Push (NP). The simple explanation is
releasing air through your nose simultaneously to playing an exhale note, split or chord. Failing to use the (NP) will make this tune nearly impossible to play. Playing an exhale note in place of the notated inhale ones will make the song less bluesy sounding. . .
Rumba Blues DownloadRumba Blues DownloadThis is a study of the commonly heard blues rumba.  One big advantage of knowing a song like this is that it is highly recognizable to any band that is familiar with blues.  This allows you to start the song off and signal the band in at the IV chord if your rhythm and playing are strong . . .
Shakey's Boogie DownloadShakey's Boogie DownloadThis song is a study of Walter Horton and how he would play a boogie type of blues. . .
Skyliner's 2nd LineSkyliner's 2nd LineThis is a study of a “head” riff, very similar to the one used in a Bill Sinigal and the Skyliners  song, but also has strong melodic resemblances to Bill Haley’s Rock Around The Clock . . .
Tramp O-Matic DownloadTramp O-Matic DownloadThis is a study of the Tramp groove, getting its name from the song “Tramp,” popularized by Otis Redding and Carla Thomas.  Remember that this groove is not a shuffle or swing.  It is a straight eighth note groove.  This is a simplified version of the older study song called “Boot Camp Tramp.”  . . . 
Twisted Tongue Swing DownloadTwisted Tongue Swing DownloadThis is a study of working the vamping/slapping into the low range of the harp as much as possible, and gets some inspiration from earlier study song, “Lock Jaw Blues,” and the John Lee “Sonny Boy” Williamson song, “Mellow Chick Swing.”
USB BluesUSB Blueshis is a study of the horn riff used in the Gary US Bonds song, Down In New Orleans. This groove is not a shuffle or swing. It is a straight eighth note Rock type of groove. The overall tonality is very blues “lite,” actually using the major scale. The solo is very accordion like . . .
Westside Box ShuffleWestside Box ShuffleThis is a study of the riff often called the “Box Shuffle” by guitar and bass players. It can be played ascending, or like this version, descending. The advantage of this is that it is highly recognizable to any band that is familiar with blues . . . 
Wishing BluesWishing BluesThis is a study of the Jungle groove, blues scale and the riff used in the Billy Boy Arnold song “I Wish You Would,” but sequenced into a 12-bar form similar to the Ray Charles song, “What’d I Say?”. This groove is not a shuffle or swing. It is a straight 8th-note groove with a heavy use of the tom drums. The overall tonality is very dark blues and is also a study in tongue block switching . . .
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